ABOUT

William R Miller

After receiving my Ph.D. in clinical psychology at the University of Oregon, I have been at the University of New Mexico since 1976, where I retired as Emeritus Distinguished Professor of Psychology and Psychiatry in 2006. Understanding addiction and its treatment has been a wonderful medium for pursuing my fundamental interest in the psychology of change. It has also been a fertile field for exploring the historic interface between spirituality and psychology.

See Specialty MI courses for Mental Health
Professionals and Coaches

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ABOUT

Motivational Interviewing

Online Courses

Health & Medical
Professionals

Online Courses

Mental Health
Professionals

 

Professional helping relationships are often about facilitating change, a topic on which people are often ambivalent. Simply advising clients to change is usually ineffective, and can even entrench the status quo. Motivational Interviewing (MI) is an alternative to the usual approach of educating clients and trying to persuade them to change. It is a particular way of conducting conversations about change to strengthen clients motivation and commitment. Four decades of research on MI, including more than a thousand controlled clinical trials, have yielded some surprising findings. First, MI has been found to be useful in helping people change across a broad array of problems in counseling and psychotherapy, health care, coaching, social work, and education. MI is also relatively brief. It has been tested within primary and specialty health care visits, and even a single session can be enough to improve treatment outcomes and trigger change in longstanding behavior patterns. In comparative trials, MI often yields results comparable to those of more intensive interventions. MI combines well with other evidence-based interventions and is not an isolated technique but rather a particular way of doing what else you do. It is also learnable, and the ability to master MI is unrelated to years of graduate education. Finally, it crosses cultures well and is now being taught and practiced in more than 50 languages on six continents.

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